Stewardship Thoughts

Many congregations’ websites describe the practice of tithing on their giving pages, almost as placeholder text. Sometimes it’s simple and direct:

“The biblical model for giving is to tithe, allocating 10%
of one’s income to the church,
so that should be your goal.”

Other descriptions are more subtle:

“We appreciate your support for this church, where our mission to share Christ’s light with
the world includes the practice of directing 10% of church gifts to support global charities.”

Thereby implying, we tithe as a church so you should, too!

As congregational leaders of Stewardship, we are aware that many in our congregations give closer to 1% than 10%, so giving invitations might not mention percentages at all. But avoiding the conversation entirely may abandon an important opportunity to nurture disciples in the joy of giving. Whether it’s welcoming a handful of crumpled dollar bills from a single parent, or a retiree’s hefty Qualified Charitable Distribution, we must provide a way for everyone to grow in their generosity and giving.

There are serious limitations if we structure our Stewardship message around the “Biblical Standard” of tithing. Let’s rethink how we invite people to give, inspiring their giving rather than obliging it.

Tithing 

The data indicates that, on average, U.S. individuals give around 2-3% of their after-tax income to charities (including churches). So while there may be some tithers in your congregation, average church-goers will give away 2-3% of their income and probably not to your congregation alone. Given this reality, if our Stewardship pitch focuses on the tithe which may be as much as four times what someone is currently giving, there is a good chance our Stewardship goal is probably not going to make its mark.

A fair reading of scripture does not reinforce any goal or requirement that Christians today should give 10% of their income to their local congregation. If tithing became a key concern of Jesus, he would probably mention it. Instead, while Jesus talks about money all the time, he is nearly always addressing people’s relationship with money, and the injustice associated with the distribution of money. In imagining the Christian life, Paul embraced generosity, cheerful giving, and caring for those in need. But there is never any sense of a 10% catchall expectation in the Gospels, epistles, or elsewhere in the New Testament.

The Old Testament includes several passages that note the practice of giving 10% to the Temple. This money went to support the Levitical priests, temple upkeep, sacrifices, and charity. Deuteronomy 14:22-29 suggests tithing also led to huge parties with good food, strong drink, and great rejoicing.

Stories

So, if we don’t use tithing as a rhetorical device to compel giving, what should we do? This path is where we should lean on invitation rather than obligation. And for Christians, invitation is a key ingredient of discipleship.

As Henri Nouwen famously observes,

“Fundraising is proclaiming what we believe in such a way that we offer
other people an opportunity to participate with us in our vision and mission.”

Stewardship ministry then becomes a way to proclaim what we believe.

One of the best ways to make this proclamation is to tell stories; stories of our ministry, stories of lives changed, stories of the Spirit working through the gifts we give to God in the offering.

  • Tell the story of Dave whose life was changed by volunteering at your food shelf.
  • Tell the story of Nikkeya who led confirmation classes and is now going to seminary.
  • Tell the story of Haden who discovered God on a mission trip.
  • Tell the story of Edna who was touched when the pastor visited her last week.

We are made of and moved by story. Stewardship, at its best, invites people to join in the story of God’s work in your midst — an invitation that can truly inspire generosity.

Deborah Rexrode
POJ Associate for Stewardship

*Adapted from a recent blog by Adam Copeland, Assistant Professor of leadership and Director of the Center for Stewardship Leaders.

 

 

ARCHIVES:

Transforming Ministry, Mission and Money (May 2019)

Gracious Stewardship (April 2019)

An Opportunity to Give (March 2019)

A Culture of Thanksgiving (February 2019)

Telling Our Story (January 2019)

Stewards of the Promise (December 2018)

Ask, Thank, Tell (November 2018)

Stewarding the Church (October 2018)

The Currency of Money (September 2018)

The Currency of Relationship (August 2018)

Holy Currencies (July 2018)

Take Hold of Life that Really is Life (June 2018)

Giving Courageously (May 2018)

Budgeting our Time (April 2018)

Eat, Pray, Love (March 2018)

Sabbath Time (February 2018)

Celebration of Giving (January 2018)

Carols for Year End Stewardship (December 2017)

Teaching Stewardship to Children (November 2017)

Stewardship of Time (October 2017)

How Much is Enough (September 2017)

An Expression of Faith (August 2017)

An Annual Stewardship Emphasis (July 2017)

Defined by Generosity (June 2017)

Trust and Transparency (May 2017)

The “T’s” of Stewardship (April 2017)

Faithful Living (March 2017)

Embracing Stewardship (February 2017)

Making Stewardship Year Round (January 2017)

A Vision of Stewardship Ministry (December 2016)

Thanks and Giving (November 2016)

Healthy Congregations (October 2016)

Grace and Gratitude (September 2016)

Budgeting and Pledging (August 2016)

A Stewardship Plan (July 2016)

Things to Know about Stewardship (June 2016)

Summer Stewardship (May 2016)

Living Generously (April 2016)

People, Passion, and Possibilities (March 2016)

Imagining Abundance (February 2016)

Stewardship 101 (January 2016)

Our Christmas Offering (December 2015)

Living is Giving (November 2015)