Holy Currencies

Eric Law is an Episcopal priest and the founder and executive director of the Kaleidoscope Institute in Los Angeles. Eric has an understanding of what it means to lead an organization and struggle with money issues. In his ministry, he has found that congregations who talk about sustainability spend a lot of time focused on money. How can we make our ministry sustainable? Where do we find the money to finance our ministries? How can we raise the money to start a needed ministry?

Congregations who talk about being missional tend not to talk about sustainability. Eric found at the Kaleidoscope Institute that what made it sustainable was not just about the money. They increased their annual budget entirely from contributions in exchange for the leadership-training programs and resources they provide. They were serving, resourcing, and building networks of relationships. Serving, resourcing, building relationships, and giving! Isn’t that what we are called to do?

After more than a year of research, Eric concluded that there are at least six currencies that flow through a sustainable missional ministry. In addition to money, these currencies are time and place, gracious leadership, relationship, truth, and wellness. These currencies “flow” through your ministry, exchanging themselves for other currencies, forming what Eric calls the “Cycle of Blessings.” The sequence rejuvenates what is spent initially, recirculates resources, and regenerates more currencies, thereby growing and expanding the ministry.

In his book, “Holy Currencies: Six Blessings for Sustainable Ministries,” Eric Law discusses each of the following types of currency and assists congregations in assessing the currencies that are often overlooked and under-utilized. Here is a brief definition of these six currencies:

Currency of Time and Place – This currency includes the paid and volunteer time that leaders and members offer to the church or ministry. It also includes any properties from which a congregation operates, and other property which can be accessed by the congregation. Imagine the volunteer hours that people give to the ministries of your church. Imagine your facility being used to its fullest capacity!

Currency of Gracious Leadership – This is the ability to use skills, tools, models, and processes to create gracious environments within which mutually respectful “relationships” and the discernment of “truth” across differences can be built among members and with non-members. Differences can be racial/ethnic, age, class, political or simply day-to-day relationships with one another.

Currency of Relationship – This is the internal and external networks of mutually respectful connections that leaders and members of a church have such as relationships among members in small groups and classes, workshops and seminars. It might also be connections with organizations outside the congregation to build relationships and partnerships to meet the needs of the community.

Currency of Truth – This type of currency is the ability to articulate the stories of your congregation, the beliefs of our denomination, and the experiences of our ministries. We often fail to use this currency to show the community, the neighborhood, the city or town what makes us unique and inviting and transformational.

Currency of Wellness – Wellness is the state of being healthy physically, socially, economically, ecologically, and spiritually within our congregations, within our neighborhoods, and within our country and the world. Congregations in a state of wellness have energy, intelligence, imagination and love enough to share with others.

Currency of Money – Money is the medium of exchange, a measure of value or a means of payment. It is often the only currency we can envision.

Consider these important facts:

  1. It is the flowing of these currencies that gives them value. If you have a beautiful church building, but it’s only used on Sunday, the currencies of time and place are not being maximized.
  2. The flowing of these currencies needs to include all six in order for ministry to be sustainable and missional. If a church uses the time of volunteers to provide wellness to the members only, there is no energy flowing outward to build new relationships.
  3. The flowing of these currencies must recirculate back to replenish what was spent to ministries can be regenerative. People experience the mission and ministry and respond with their giving.

Over the next few months, I will be sharing with you more about each of these currencies and how you might incorporate them into your stewardship efforts.

Please contact me at Deborah@presbyteryofthejames.org or 434-996-6032 if I can assist you in your fall Stewardship planning.

Deborah Rexrode
Associate for Stewardship for the Presbytery of the James

*Excerpts taken from “Holy Currencies: Six Blessings for Sustainable Ministries” by Eric H. F. Law.

Stewardship of Time

Adam Copeland has recently edited a book entitled, “Beyond the Offering Plate: A Holistic Approach to Stewardship.” In this book, he has brought together writings from various scholars and theologians on the topic of Stewardship. These authors help us to expand our understanding of what Stewardship really means and broaden that definition beyond the usual interpretation of time, talents, and treasures.